Showing posts with label The Shining. Show all posts
Showing posts with label The Shining. Show all posts

Tuesday, 6 August 2019

The 3-Quark Model of 1990



“Something CHANGED in The Culture around 1990...”

— Camile Paglia 






















If you love somebody enough
You'll follow wherever they go
That's how I got to Memphis
That's how I got to Memphis

If you love somebody enough
You'll go where your heart wants to go
That's how I got to Memphis
That's how I got to Memphis

I know if you'd seen her you'd tell me 'cause you are my friend
I've got to find her and find out the trouble she's in
If you tell me that she's not here
I'll follow the trail of her tears
That's how I got to Memphis
That's how I got to Memphis

She would get mad and she used to say
That she'd come back to Memphis someday
That's how I got to Memphis
That's how I got to Memphis

I haven't eaten a bite
Or slept for three days and nights
That's how I got to Memphis
That's how I got to Memphis

I've got to find her and tell her that I love her so
I'll never rest 'til I find out why she had to go
Thank you for your precious time
Forgive me if I start to cryin'
That's how I got to Memphis (x8)

Thursday, 24 May 2018

The Perils of Emasculating Encouragement


"Women whose relationship with men has been seriously pathologized cannot distinguish between male authority and competence and male tyrannical power. 



They fail to differentiate because all they see is the oppressive male. And they may have had experiences that. . . Their experiences with men might have been rough enough so that differentiation never
occurred. 



Because it has to occur. 

And you have to have a lot of experience with men - and good men, too - before that will occur.




But it seems to me that we’re also increasingly dominated by a view of masculinity that’s mostly characteristic of women who have terrible personality disorders, and who are unable to have healthy relationships with men. 

But here’s the problem. 

This is something my wife has pointed out, too. She said, ‘Well men are going to have to stand up for themselves.’ 

But here’s the problem.



I know how to stand up to a man who’s unfairly trespassing against me. 



And the reason I know that is because the parameters for my resistance are quite well defined, which is: we talk, we argue, we push, and then it becomes physical. 



If we move beyond the boundaries of civil discourse, we know what the next step is.

That’s forbidden in discourse with women. And so I don’t think that men can control crazy women. 

I really don’t believe it. I think they have to throw their hands up in. . . In
what? It’s not even disbelief. It’s that the cultural. . . There’s no step forward that you can take under those circumstances, because if the man is offensive enough and crazy enough, the reaction becomes physical right away. Or at least the threat is there.

And when men are talking to each other in any serious manner, that underlying threat of physicality is always there, especially if it’s a real conversation. It keeps the thing civilized to some degree. 

If you’re talking to a man who wouldn’t fight with you under any l circumstances whatsoever, then you’re talking to someone [for] whom you have absolutely no respect.

But I can’t see any way. . . For example there’s a woman in Toronto who’s been organizing this movement, let’s say, against me and some other people who are going to do a free speech event. And she managed to organize quite effectively, and she’s quite offensive, you might say. She compared us to Nazis, for example, publicly, using the Swastika, which wasn’t something I was all that fond of.

But I’m defenseless against that kind of female insanity, because the techniques that I would use against a man who was employing those tactics are forbidden to me. So I don’t know. . . It seems to me that it isn’t men who have to stand up and say, ‘Enough of this.’ Even though that is what they should do, it seems to me that it’s sane women who have to stand up against their crazy sisters and say, ‘Look, enough of that. Enough man-hating. Enough pathology. Enough bringing disgrace on us as a gender.’

But the problem there - and then I’ll stop my little tirade - is that most of the women I know who are sane are busy doing sane things. They have their career. 

They have their family. They’re quite occupied, and they don’t seem to have the time, or maybe even the interest, to go after their crazy, harpy sisters. And so I don’t see any regulating force for that terrible femininity. And it seems to me to be invading the culture and undermining the masculine power of the culture in a way that’s, I think, fatal. I really do believe that."