Showing posts with label Moriarty. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Moriarty. Show all posts

Saturday, 15 December 2018

The Phantom Menace








“For years past I have continually been conscious of some power behind the malefactor, some deep organizing power which forever stands in the way of the law, and throws its shield over the wrong-doer. Again and again in cases of the most varying sorts—forgery cases, robberies, murders—I have felt the presence of this force, and I have deduced its action in many of those undiscovered crimes in which I have not been personally consulted. For years I have endeavored to break through the veil which shrouded it, and at last the time came when I seized my thread and followed it, until it led me, after a thousand cunning windings, to ex-Professor Moriarty of mathematical celebrity.





He is the Napoleon of crime, Watson. He is the organizer of half that is evil and of nearly all that is undetected in this great city. He is a genius, a philosopher, an abstract thinker. He has a brain of the first order. He sits motionless, like a spider in the center of its web, but that web has a thousand radiations, and he knows well every quiver of each of them. He does little himself. He only plans. But his agents are numerous and splendidly organized. Is there a crime to be done, a paper to be abstracted, we will say, a house to be rifled, a man to be removed—the word is passed to the Professor, the matter is organized and carried out. The agent may be caught. In that case money is found for his bail or his defence. 







But the central power which uses the agent is never caught—never so much as suspected. This was the organization which I deduced, Watson, and which I devoted my whole energy to exposing and breaking up.








“But the Professor was fenced round with safeguards so cunningly devised that, do what I would, it seemed impossible to get evidence which would convict in a court of law. You know my powers, my dear Watson, and yet at the end of three months I was forced to confess that I had at last met an antagonist who was my intellectual equal. My horror at his crimes was lost in my admiration at his skill. 



But at last he made a trip—only a little, little trip—but it was more than he could afford when I was so close upon him. I had my chance, and, starting from that point, I have woven my net round him until now it is all ready to close. In three days—that is to say, on Monday next—matters will be ripe, and the Professor, with all the principal members of his gang, will be in the hands of the police. Then will come the greatest criminal trial of the century, the clearing up of over forty mysteries, and the rope for all of them; but if we move at all prematurely, you understand, they may slip out of our hands even at the last moment.

Now, if I could have done this without the knowledge of Professor Moriarty, all would have been well. But he was too wily for that. He saw every step which I took to draw my toils round him. Again and again he strove to break away, but I as often headed him off. I tell you, my friend, that if a detailed account of that silent contest could be written, it would take its place as the most brilliant bit of thrust-and-parry work in the history of detection. Never have I risen to such a height, and never have I been so hard pressed by an opponent. He cut deep, and yet I just undercut him. This morning the last steps were taken, and three days only were wanted to complete the business. I was sitting in my room thinking the matter over, when the door opened and Professor Moriarty stood before me.”








“But there is one crucial difference, between Us, and Richard Nixon.

When We look in The Mirror in The Morning —

We Think We’re Too Fat.”



“But we must plan what we are to do about Moriarty now.”

“As this is an express, and as the boat runs in connection with it, I should think we have shaken him off very effectively.”

“My dear Watson, you evidently did not realize my meaning when I said that this man may be taken as being quite on the same intellectual plane as myself. You do not imagine that if I were the pursuer I should allow myself to be baffled by so slight an obstacle. Why, then, should you think so meanly of him?”

“What will he do?”

“What I should do?”

“What would you do, then?”

“Engage a special.”

“But it must be late.”

“By no means. This train stops at Canterbury; and there is always at least a quarter of an hour's delay at the boat. He will catch us there.”

“One would think that we were the criminals. Let us have him arrested on his arrival.”

“It would be to ruin the work of three months. We should get the big fish, but the smaller would dart right and left out of the net. On Monday we should have them all. No, an arrest is inadmissible.”

“What then?”

“We shall get out at Canterbury.”

“And then?”

“Well, then we must make a cross-country journey to Newhaven, and so over to Dieppe. Moriarty will again do what I should do. He will get on to Paris, mark down our luggage, and wait for two days at the depot. 

In the meantime we shall treat ourselves to a couple of carpet-bags, encourage the manufactures of the countries through which we travel, and make our way at our leisure into Switzerland, via Luxembourg and Basle.”

At Canterbury, therefore, we alighted, only to find that we should have to wait an hour before we could get a train to Newhaven.






Wednesday, 19 September 2018

Behind The Waterfall




Mycroft :
Do you? 

Sherlock :
Do I what? 
H-how did you get that? 
I left it at the crime scene. 

Mycroft :
"Crime scene"? 
Where do you pick up these extraordinary expressions? 
Do you miss him? 





Sherlock :
Moriarty is dead.

Mycroft :
And yet...? 

Sherlock :
His body was never recovered. 

Mycroft :
To be expected when one pushes a maths professor over a waterfall. 
Pure reason toppled by sheer melodrama. 
Your life in a nutshell. 





Sherlock :
Where do you pick up these extraordinary expressions? 

(HE SNIFFS) 

Sherlock :
Have you put on weight? 

Mycroft :
You saw me only yesterday. 
Does that seem possible? 

Sherlock :
No. 

Mycroft :
Yet, here I am, increased. 
What does that tell the foremost criminal investigator in England? 

Sherlock :
In England? 

Mycroft :
You're in deep, Sherlock, deeper than you ever intended to be. 
Have you made a list? 

Sherlock :
Of what? 

Mycroft :
Everything. We will need a list. 
Good boy. 

Sherlock :
No, I haven't finished yet. 

Mycroft :
Moriarty may beg to differ. 

(HE SIGHS) 

Sherlock :
He's trying to distract me. 
To derail me. 



Mycroft :
Yes. He's the crack in the lens, the fly in the ointment



The virus in the data. 

Sherlock :
I have to finish this. 



Mycroft :
If Moriarty has risen from the Reichenbach cauldron, he will seek you out. 

Sherlock :
I'll be waiting.

Mycroft :
Yes. I'm very much afraid you will..... 






Mrs. Hudson : 
Two days he's been like that. 

Lestrade :
Has he eaten? 


Mrs. Hudson : 
No, not a morsel. 

Lestrade :
Press are having a ruddy field day. 
There's still reporters outside. 

Mrs. Hudson : 
Oh, they've been there all the time, I can't get rid of them. 

I've been rushed off my feet making tea. 

Lestrade :
Why do you make him tea? 

Mrs. Hudson : 
I dunno, I just sort of — do. 

Lestrade :
He said, "There's only one suspect," and then he just walks away and now he won't explain. 
Which is strange, because he likes that bit. 

Said it was so simple I could solve it. 

Mrs. Hudson : 
I'm sure he was exaggerating. 


Lestrade :
What's he doing, do you think? 

Mrs. Hudson : 
He says he's waiting. 

Lestrade :
For what? 

Mrs. Hudson : 
The Devil. 


I wouldn't be surprised. 
We get all sorts here. 

Well, wire me if there's any change. 

Mrs. Hudson : 
Yeah. 




(CREAKING

(FOOTSTEPS


Lucifer :
Everything I have to say has already crossed your mind. 

Sherlock :
Then possibly my answer has crossed yours. 

Lucifer :
Like a bullet.